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ARMY RECCE DD-96


by Piotr Gorka


2 October 1944 Holland.

Spitfire Mk IXs of 308 Squadron (Polish) during Armed Recco task.

Section four machines attacking the fraight train near Dordrecht in Holland.

Fighter ZF-T was flown by F/Sgt Jerzy Glowczewski, in this day.



L/E 320 Limited Edition signed & numbered prints


Each of these editions are individuall numbered

Overall print size:  25 3/4 " wide 20 " high    65,5 x 51 cm

Image size:  21" wide 14 3/4" high      53,2 x 37,5 cm

Printed On HQ Acid Free Permanent Paper 250 Gr




S/N 288 Signed and Numbered FIVE signatures       PRICE 195 € plus postage


Signed by


Squadron Leader  JERZY POPLAWSKI  VMv CV DFC

Squadron Leader  FRANCISZEK KORNICKI  VMv CV

Flying Officer  STANISLAW BOCHNIAK  VMv CV DFC

Flying Officer  HENRYK KRAKOWIAN  CV

Flight Sergeant  JERZY GLOWCZEWSKI  CV



A/P Artists Proof 45 signed by artist and TEN airmen     PRICE 260 € plus postage


Signed by


Squadron Leader IGNACY OLSZEWSKI  VMv CV DFC

Squadron Leader  JERZY POPLAWSKI  VMv CV DFC

Squadron Leader  FRANCISZEK KORNICKI  VMv KW

Flight Lieutenant KAZIMIERZ BUDZIK  VMv CV**

Flying Officer  STANISLAW BOCHNIAK  VMv CV DFC

Flying Officer  TADEUSZ SZLENKIER  CV

Flying Officer  EDWARD JAWORSKI  DFC VMv CV** DFC

Flying Officer WLADYSLAW CHCIUK  VMv CV*

Flying Officer  HENRYK KRAKOWIAN  CV

Flight Sergeant  JERZY GLOWCZEWSKI  CV











French pastoral scene Spitfire IX PL286 ZF-Z of 308 Squadron uswaly piloted by CO B Flight F/Lt Stanislaw Wandzilak,

at Plumetot (B.10) Advanced Landing Ground, with a hay cart in the field behind









   In last months 1944 No.131 Polish Fighter Wing was composed of three squadrons No.302 'Poznan', No.308  'Krakow' and No.317 'Wilno'.

  

    In October 1944 No.131 Wing moved to Belgim, arriving at B.70 Antwerp/Deurne airfield on the 3rd and from there going to B.61 St.Denis Westram near Ghent on the 11th, where it stayed for three months. Intesive armed reconnaissance, dive-bombing and strafing operations were made during the month by individual squadrons which flew up to five missions per day, either at foll strenght or in section. Over 100 sorties were recorded by the wing in  five days. On the 29th the highest number of 148 sorties was achieved, and the total bombload dropped since D-Day exceeded 1 milion Ibs. The wing's monthly total came to 1,295 sorties (63% armed reconnaissance and 37% direct army support) in 1,303 hours. The Luftwaffe was almost completely absent and the few losses suffered were all due to the ground defences.

  

No.308 Sqn, on the day of its greates effor, 29 October, flew 52 combat sorties, these including dive-bombing of German artillery positions at Flushing by 12 aircraft and destroing a German army HQ at Knocke. The squadron logged a total of 40 missions during the month, comprising 409 sorties in 442 hours and dropped 85 tons of bombs, claiming the destruction of some 30 vehicles, four railway engines and several carriages and 14 barges. Three of its Spitfires, damaged by AA fire, made forced landings, but none of the pilots was lost or injured. In the last two months of 1944 No.131 Wing continued its armed reconnaissance work, w hich constituted some 50% of all its operations. In November direct army support represented 32% of the sorties flown, and fighter sweeps and bomber escort, the remaining 18%. The close support mission in the earl part of the month covered the Dunkerque area and the Breda and Utrecht sector, and later concentrated on the Venlo section on the front on the River Maas. In December direct army support dropped to 7,5% of the sorties flown, fighter sweeps accounting for the rest. The squadrons operated mostly in sections, rather than at full strenght, in order to keep the largest possible area under constant surveillance and attack. The absence of the Lufftwaffe made this quite safe. Enemy rail facilities, bridges and roads were persistently dive-bombed and strafed, severly disrupting all traffic and bringing it to a complatestandstill during the daylight hours. The success of these activities severly hampered desperate German efforts to launch the V1 flying bombs and the awesome V2 rockets from Holland and helped in the re-opening of Anfwerp as supply port.




Combat     film     2 TAF    F/LKaczmarek  317Sqn

18.11.44           Spitfire

Attacking   locomotives







Mr. Stanislaw Bochniak 308 & 317 Squadrons PAF





Mr Franciszek Kornicki in Spitfire's cockpit. He was commander

308 squadron, between 12 February 1943 and 3 March 1943.




Combat    film   2 TAF F/ORaszewski 302Sqn 17.11.44             Spitfire

Attacking   freight   train










This Spitfire was delivered from CBAF to an ASU (no.33 MU) in early May 1944, and thence by mid-June to no.308,

becoming the porsonal mount of unit OC, was duly coded 'R for Retinger' MK984 was used in 308 until the end

of 1944, and was destroyed on the ground in the New Year's Day attack of the Luftwaffe






Spitfire LF.IX MK984 ZF-R No.308 (Polish) Squadron ‘City of Cracow’, St Denis Westrem (Belgium), autumn 1944.”Lala” personal name under the windscreen, both sides. Mision markings on the port side of the cowling only.

 












Flight Sergeant  Jerzy Glowczewski's log book







  



Combat record of 308 squadron, mach red stripe  Sgt.J.Glowczewski's  part.









           

Spitfire LF.IX Mk940 ZF-B at a forward airfield in the middle of harvesting (believed to be B.5 on 29 July 1944)

The aeroplan displays invasion striping on the bottom of the fuselage and wings.



Piotr Górka © 2007