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CONSANGUINITY

 

by Piotr Górka


Two Thunderbold P-47s of  61st FS 56th FG on patrol fligh.

The HV-A is flown by the USAAF top fighter ace Lt.col. Francis Gabreski

(son of the Polish emigree) His wingman-coded HV-M is the Polish ace F/Lt

Boleslaw Gladych, posted temporarily from No.302 Squadron (Polish)



L/E 350 Limited Edition signed & numbered prints

 

Each of these editions are individuall numbered

  Overall print size: 26"wide  19 3/4"high     65.5 x 50 cm

  Image size: 21 1/2"wide  15 1/2"high   55 x 39 cm

Printed on HQ Acid Free Permanent Graphick Paper 250 Gr



 

N/S 270   signed by artist and FOUR airmen     PRICE 190 € plus postage

  

signed by artist and


Wing Commander  TADEUSZ SAWICZ   VM CV** DFC DFCUSA

Squadron Leader  TADEUSZ ANDERSZ  VM CV*** DFC DFCUSA

Squadron Leader  BOLESLAW GLADYCH  VM CV** DFC

  Flight Lieutenant   WITOLD LANOWSKI  CV

 


 


 


   A/P 80 Multi Signatures  signed by artist and SIX airmen     PRICE 225 € plus postage

  

signed by artist and


Wing Commander  TADEUSZ SAWICZ   VM CV** DFC DFCUSA

Squadron Leader  TADEUSZ ANDERSZ  VM CV*** DFC DFCUSA  

Squadron Leader  BOLESLAW GLADYCH  VM CV** DFC

  Flight Lieutenant  FRANCIS GABRESKI  DFCUSA CV

Fligh Lieutenant  CZESLAW GLOWCZYNSKI  VM CV* DFC

Flight Lieutenant   WITOLD LANOWSKI  CV




GICLEE PRINTS


Overall print size: 33 3/4" wide 26" high     86 x 66 cm

Image size:   29" wide 20" high     74 x 51 cm


PRICE 99 € plus postage


Open Edition


signed by artist


All giclee  prints are printed using bubble jet printing technology much higher quality than the normal home computer version.

All giclee prints are very similar to litography version. They have the image sourrounded by a plain ecry colour border in which

the title and text. All prints are personally signed by the artist.










GABRESKI'S POLES

 

     In late 1942 Capt Francis Gabreski of the Eight Air Force arrived in Britain. Thanks to his parentage he spoke Polish, and so duly applied for a posting to a Polish unit in order to acquire combat experience. He was sent to the Northolt Wing, where W/Cdr Kolaczkowski assigned him to S/Ldr Tadeusz Sawicz's No 315 Sqn. Gabreski flew eleven combat and two ASR missions with this unit between December 1942 and February 1943, gaining ivaluable operational experience and having many good times out of the cocpit at Orchad's and elsewhere. He also developed a number of strong friendships with the Polish pilots. Within a year Gabreski was commander of the P-47 equipped 61st FS within Hub Zemke's legendary 56th FG, seeing plenty of action escorting B-17s over Germany. Conversely, his chums at Northolt had hardly seen a German aircraft for months as they went about hitting ground targets as part of the 'softening of the Atlantic Wall' in preparation for D-Day. With pilots frustrated at the lack of aerial opposition, it therefore came as no surprise when several applied for an exchange posting to an American unit once they had completed their combat tours. The first to obtain such a posting was W/Cdr Gabszewicz, who joined the 56th FG on 12  December 1943. Others, assuming that they would not be missed at staff posts in London, joined Gabreski,s unit for occasional missions without any official sanction!

     

 

 

 

A group of Polish pilots who during 1944 -1945 flew in combat in the 61st Fighter Squadron  56 th Fighter Group USAAF, invited by Francis Gabreski, pose in front of a Republic P-47 Thunderbolt. Left to right: Boleslaw Gladych, Tadeusz Sawicz, Francis Gabreski, Kazimierz Rutkowski, Tadeusz Andersz and Witold Lanowski.

 

 

 

 

   The latter group included F/O Tadeusz Andersz (who had taught 'Gabby' many 'tricks of the trade' during his No 315 Sqn days), F/Lt Boleslaw Gladych and F/Lt Witold Lanowski. These pilots would all add further kills to their respective score whilst flying P-47s over the coming months. Andersz eventually returned to a Polish squadron, but the unofficial status of the other two became know throughout the USAAF, as well as the PAF, later in the year. Polish authorities attempted to discipline Gladych and Lanowski, who had caused headaches amongs the 'high brass' of the PAF on previous occasions, giving them the choice of resuming their official duties or being expelled from the service-both swiftly chose to fly fighters rather than desks, and thus had to leave the ranks of Poland's air arm. Remaining in P-47s, Gladych had downed ten enemy aircraft and Lanowski four by the end of 1944. Although the staff at PAF HQ looked favourably upon the idea of sending airmen to fly with USAAF units in order to gain combat experience that could be useful after the war, the Eight Air Force's strategic bombing role was not deemed to be relevant to the anticipated postwar mission of the Polish Air Force. However, the tactically-optimised Ninth Air Force offered many more useful opportunities, and a number of officers were duly posted to its units, including aces F/Lt Glowacki and Glowczynski. The former, dsappointed with staff paperwork, applied for a flying possting, and was given command of the PAF's No309 Sqn in September 1944. Glowczynski took a less official route to operational flying by obtaining a posting to the 366th FG, ostensibly to study logistical problems encountered whilst operating in the field! He would fly Thunderbolts with the 390th FS unit the end of the war.

 

 

 

 



Mr. Tadeusz Andersz and Piotr Gorka, London 07 September 1997.







Piotr Górka © 2007