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DANGEROUS SKY

 

by Piotr Górka

Polish PZL P-11c in combat with Me 109 on the Polish Campaign September 1939. 


  L/E 250 signed & numbered prints   


  A/S   70 Artist Signed Only  PRICE 50 € plus postage

 

Each of these editions are individuall numbered

  Overall print size:  17 1/5"wide  13"high   43 x 31,5 cm

  Image size: 14 1/2"wide  10"high    36 x 25 cm

Printed On HQ Acid Free Permanent Paper 250 g

 



S/N  162 Signed Numbered TWO signatures  PRICE 80 € plus postage


signed by

 

porucznik pilot   FRANCISZEK KORNICKI   VMv CV**   

162 Eskadra Mysliwska in "Polish Campaign" September 1939 

 

porucznik pilot  WLODZIMIERZ GEDYMIN  VMv CV* 

131 Eskadra Mysliwska

(3,5 destroyed in "Polish Campaign" September 1939)





A/P  18 Artist Proof FOUR signatures  PRICE 110 € plus postage


signed by artist and


porucznik pilot   FRANCISZEK KORNICKI   VMv CV**   

162 Eskadra Mysliwska in "Polish Campaign" September 1939

 

porucznik pilot  WLODZIMIERZ GEDYMIN  VMv CV* 

131 Eskadra Mysliwska 

(3,5 destroyed in "Polish Campaign" September 1939)


kapral pilot  MICHAL CWYNAR  VMv CV* DFC

113 Eskadra Mysliwska

(1 destroyed in "Polish Campaign" September 1939)




 






     The German invasion on 1 September 1939 revealed both the strong and weak points of the Polish Air Force. Polish squadrons moved to forward airfields at the end of August ahead of German attacks. Althought the Luftwaffe claimed to have destroyed the Polish Air Force on the ground, this was a lie. Air defence of Warsaw led by Col. Stefan Pawlikowski proved the value of Polish airmen during the first week of the campaign but soon the Pursuit brigade was left with many more skilled pilots than serviceable aircraft. This pattern was repeated in most air units. Efforts of the operstional personnel were hampered by poor communications and logistics. Many repairable aircraft were lost through lack of spares or repair facilities and sometimes due to lack of fuel. Poor aircraft recognition, especially on the part of the ground forces, led to numerous friendly fire incidents. From the moment France and Britain declared war on Germany on 3 September it was hoped that the war would be won soon. But when the Soviet Union invaded Poland from the East on 17 September and the  Western powers had not raised a finger, it became obvious that the fighting in Poland was over for some time at least.


























Mr Wlodzimierz Gedymin in his home in Poltusk

Piotr Górka © 2007